Movie Box - Offline Movie Server for Roku

Stream movies from a Raspberry Pi without using a network connection. Useful during power outages, hiking in remote locations (with a HMDI monitor strapped to your pack, or locations with restricted or no available network. This combines my HMS and Clortho projects with a simple installation script to setup an old Pi I have laying around so that it will stream movies from a USB drive directly to the Roku.

Transitioning to a New GPG Key

I am transitioning to a new GnuPG key, here is my transition statement, based on one from Simon Josefsson Here is my signed statement: - -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA512,SHA1 OpenPGP Key Transition Statement for Brian C. Lane I have created a new OpenPGP key and will be transitioning away from my old key. The old key has not been compromised and will continue to be valid for 30 days, but I prefer all future correspondence to be encrypted to the new key, and will be making signatures with the new key going forward.

Creating OpenStack images with livemedia-creator

I was going to write about using mock to make live iso's without using virt-install, but this week is the OpenStack Summit and one of the things you can use livemedia-creator (lmc) for is making disk images for use with OpenStack. If you followed the instructions in my previous post on creating live isos you already have everything you need except the kickstart and OpenStack. I'm not going to cover how to setup OpenStack, I used the instructions from the RDO project Quickstart without too much trouble.

Creating live isos with livemedia-creator

In this post I am going to describe how to create bootable live isos using livemedia-creator (lmc). It was created so that the same Anaconda installer logic would be used for installing systems and creating bootable media like the live iso. lmc can also be used to create disk images, but I'll cover that in the next post. Anaconda and kickstart are used to install the packages, and lmc compresses the filesystem and wraps it up in an iso.

Creating the Anaconda boot.iso with lorax

Fedora 22 is almost here, so I thought I'd write a couple posts on how to use lorax and livemedia-creator to create bootable Fedora images. I'll start with lorax. It is used to create the Anaconda boot.iso which is used to install systems using a network connection. You can also automate your installations by using the boot.iso with a kickstart file. Lorax is part of the current release-engineering workflow and is used to create the boot.
Saving the state for Home Media Server

Saving the state for Home Media Server

Home Media Server is a Roku application for streaming video from a http server. I started the project in 2009 after Roku released the SDK for their devices. Originally it was a server and a client, but I rewrote it in 2010 as just a client so that the only external dependency was a http server that could handle partial file requests. In 2013 I rewrote the client to use the gridScreen layout which lets you display more content at the same time and makes it easier to split things into categories.
Setup oath ssh login on Fedora

Setup oath ssh login on Fedora

There are occasions where I’d like to be able to ssh to a system without using the password or having to setup a ssh key. Another alternative for authentication is the pam_oath module which allows you to use OATH applications like FreeOTP or Google Authenticator for 2-factor logins. Start by installing the required packages. This is specific to Fedora, other distributions will be similar but slightly different in fun and challenging ways.

Deploying clortho with ansible and venv

I have started using Ansible to manage the few services that I still have running around here. I want to deploy clortho to a user on the system I use for serving up movies to my Roku players. I need to copy the source, setup a venv with the dependencies (aiohttp), and setup a systemd unit to make sure it is started at boot time. As of Python 3.3 the core library includes support for venv, and Python 3.

clortho - A simple key/value server

clortho is a very simple key/value server written using python 3.4 and aiohttp key namespace is per-client IP address, and there is no authentication. It supports direct connections from clients, and the X-Forwarded-For header for use with proxies. I shouldn’t have to mention that running this on an open network isn’t a good idea. Get a key value by requesting http://server/keystore/<key>: curl http://server/keystore/louis If the key has been set it will return a 200 status with the value.

https is now the default protocol

On June 5th the EFF called for people to ‘Reset the Net’ and do something to enhance their privacy on the net. I have put off switching to https for my sites because I host them using S3 and CloudFront, and up until recently it was extremely expensive to use a SSL certificate with your site. But now, thanks to SNI support in CloudFront, the cost is just slightly more than for http requests.